Buddhist Third Class Junkmail Oracle

As poet, artist and publisher, d.a. levy was an important literary and underground figure in Cleveland's emerging poetry and small/alternative press scene in the early 1960s and continued to be until his untimely death in 1968. levy documented his love-hate relationship with thecity and the politics of the day through his poetry and art which today provides a unique political and social perspective of 1960s Cleveland.
The Buddhist Third Class Junkmail Oracle is an early, key, mimeograph publication which was not only a flashpoint for freedom of speech and poetics but was also a radical example of collage and underground publishing.

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❱❱ Anarchy: What It Is and Why Pop Culture Loves It

Contrary to popular representations Anarchy is a philosophy of radical care, not chaos. Kim Kelly wrote a primer for Teen Vouge…

Anarchism is a radical, revolutionary leftist political philosophy that advocates for the abolition of government, hierarchy, and all other unequal systems of power. It seeks to replace what its proponents view as inherently oppressive institutions — like a capitalist society or the prison industrial complex — with nonhierarchical, horizontal structures powered by voluntary associations between people. Anarchists organize around a key set of principles, including horizontalism, mutual aid, autonomy, solidarity, direct action, and direct democracy, a form of democracy in which the people make decisions themselves via consensus (as opposed to representative democracy, of which the United States government is an example).

Can friendship be revalued as a radical, transformative form of kinship?

We are not sure, but we want to try. Maybe the concept of friendship is already too colonized by liberalism and capitalism. Under neoliberalism, friendship is a banal affair of private preferences: we hang out, we share hobbies, we make small talk. We become friends with those who are already like us, and we keep each other comfortable rather than becoming different and more capable together. The algorithms of Facebook and other social networks guide us towards the refinement of our profiles, reducing friendship to the click of a button. This neoliberal friend is the alternative to hetero- and homonormative coupling: “just friends” implies much weaker and insignificant bond than a lover could ever be. Under neoliberal friendship, we don’t have each other’s backs, and our lives aren’t tangled up together. But these insipid tendencies do not mean that friendships are pointless, only that friendship is a terrain of struggle.

Joyful Militancy by carla bergman and Nick Montgomery